Minority Report

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 Minority Report is a science fiction film directed by Steven Spielberg about the futuristic world of 2054, set in Washington DC.  In this time murder has been all but stopped due to the start of the pre-crime program.  Through this invention, and the use of the "Precogs," the pre-crime police force is able to look into the near future and prevent murders from happening.  Minority report is a story based upon the the idea of hacking into the precog's minds in order to forsee the future.  This directly relates to our class in that the precog's would have been normal children had they not had their special abilities enhanced through technology making them into cyborgs (see The Cyborg Manifesto).


Contents

Plot

As slightly referred to earlier, John Anderton is a member of the experimental Pre-Crime division of the local police force in Washington D.C. Here, biomedically altered children called "pre-cogs" have the ability to see into the future. However, all the children see is murder. Through technological advances, the Pre-Crime division has the ability to read the minds of these young children and analyze the recorded footage using "scrubbing" techniques to find clues about the location of the future murder. After a bit of "scrubbing" and being told who the killer and victim are on small wooden-inscribed balls, The Pre-Crime division sets out to find its criminal. However, the children are not always right. These are called minority reports.


John Anderton was going through a normal day of work at the Department of Justice, when a red, premeditated murder ball rolls down the chute.  This ball however has John Anderson's name on it, and says he will murder a man named Leo Crow.  The only problem is John Anderton has never heard of a Leo Crow, let alone been planning his murder.  After fleeing from the headquarters, he realizes that there may be a Minority Report, or conflicting premonition from one of the pregogs which could possibly prove his innocence, or at least throw some doubt on the situation.  John Anderton resolves to steal one of the precogs, Agatha, which leads to a wild journey looking for answers, all the while being chased by the police for a murder he has not yet committed.


Characters

John Anderton: The protagonist, a middle aged Pre-Crime chief.  Interprets the precog's visions in order to determine guilt.

Director Lamar Burgess The antagonist of the story, and the leader of the Pre-Crim bureau.

Agatha: The lead precog with the most premenicent powers.

Lara: Anderton's ex-wife.

Relating to other Readings

Schismatrix

A common theme between Schismatrix and Minority Report is the use of drugs to alter the biochemical structure of human beings in a futuristic time. In Schismatrix, Lindsay uses drugs, along with all of the other Shapers in society, to genetically enhance themselves to accomplish many tasks that would certainly be unattainable by any other human being. As an extreme example, Kitsune, the head of the Geisha Bank, is a Shaper who genetically altered herself to be abnormally sexually appealing.

Although the pre-cogs do not exist to be sexually appealing, they were genetically altered. In response, they gained the ability to see into the future. Unfortunately, all they can see are premeditated murders as opposed to having higher brain function for something more pleasant such as extensive intellectual capacity.

He, She, and It

The pre-cogs are similiar to Yod from Tikva. Yod's sole purpose in life is to be the protector of Tikva, and thats all he did in his life. The precog's had the same purpose in life. Their job in life was to forsee trouble in their city, and inform the authorites so that they could stop it from happening. They weren't on the front lines like Yod was, but they still spent their lives protecting their city. In the end Yod is freed from his burden by sacrificing himself for the greater good. The precog's are freed, just because it just wasn't right for them to be caged, and not have a choice, because they were so young.

In order to extract the vindictive vision from the precog, Anderton goes to his one of his connections who works at a a place that markets neurostimulation. Among the many rooms in the place, we briefly see a glimpse of an unconfident businessman surrounded by holographic figures constantly appraising him, and lewd teenager surrounded by holographic strippers. It is very possible that this is how stimmies in He, She and It were developed.

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